Rhythmic Reading

I've started two YouTube playlists on Rhythmic Reading, or how I use affect and rhythm to bring picture books to life.

They're very much a work in progress, but I'm excited to share them with you all as I learn along the way.

The first playlist has read alouds in which I read picture books the way I would in classrooms and workshops.

The second playlist uses these same books, but now I take pauses in the reading to discuss the hows and whys behind my reading style. It's a free video class on an easy to learn technique that I hope parents and educators can use!

This is my first time filiming in earnest and I have a lot to learn, so any feedback and comments are welcome!

Also, please let me know if there are any books you think I should record. I have a list already that I'm working through, but I'd be happy to make some additions!

Class Environment

A big consideration in prepping for the workshops is the class environment, or how things are arranged and set up in the room to best support student learning.

One important component of design for the sessions I run is a circular structure.

I do this because I want the poets to be able to reference one another. The social-emotional and self-expressive aspects of these workshops are just as important as the academic and in order to facilitate these empathic aspects I need to set up the room in a way that promotes communication between poets.

A circle of classrrom chairs, black and one blue, on a tiled floor. In the middle of the circle of chairs is a smaller circle of colored cards. In the foreground is a classroom dry-erase whiteboard.

A circle of classrrom chairs, black and one blue, on a tiled floor. In the middle of the circle of chairs is a smaller circle of colored cards. In the foreground is a classroom dry-erase whiteboard.

For example, in my younger workshops where I use the movement cards I put the circle of cards in the center of the larger seating circle. This gives each poet a kind of performance for their turn and then I still keep an open space for writing on the board, trying to keep it so that the poem is a kind of part of the circle.

I like to keep the room clear as well, nothing but the seating and activity.

It’s important to note as well, that teachers, therapists, and other facilitators are sitting (or standing in the case of other workshops) with the poets. This equanimity in seating is twofold in that it’s a visual representation of the fact that all voices are valued, student voice on the same tier as adult voice, and it allows for seamless 1:1 support. Whether that support is because a therapist is using this session as a group mandate and needs to work in close capacity to fulfill goals or because a poet needs sensory support in a moment of challenge, this set up makes it so that there are no dramatic/run across the room/jump in the middle of the activity/ stop everything situations that arise.

It’s pretty simple, but taking small considerations can make big improvements in peer learning.

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Edupreneur: Early Bird

There’s the old saying, "the early bird gets the worm." While the twenty-four hour nature of the world today renders that a bit invalid, in education and the education market that phrase still holds true.

Everyone who works in schools: teachers, administrators, staff, custodians, etc. knows how it feels to get up early. Making the shift from an edupreneur didn’t change my natural (or real) alarm clock as I still find myself waking up before sunrise most days.


Four alarms set on a smart phone at various times: Rebecca School 6am on Tuesdays and Fridays, BX Museum 6:30am Monday and Wednesday, NYRP Workshop 10am on Saturday and Sunday, and Nap 3:15pm on Sunday. A light blue slide shows us that all the alarms are currently turned on.

Four alarms set on a smart phone at various times: Rebecca School 6am on Tuesdays and Fridays, BX Museum 6:30am Monday and Wednesday, NYRP Workshop 10am on Saturday and Sunday, and Nap 3:15pm on Sunday. A light blue slide shows us that all the alarms are currently turned on.


This skill is useful though, not only in terms of time management and efficiency, but in keeping me in the same time frame as my market.

For example:

I know if I send an email in the morning it’ll be answered faster than one sent in the afternoon because so many teachers check their emails as part of prep before school starts.

So if I want to blast out a newsletter with important information or a deal, I'll be creating content at the same time my audience is ready to interact with it.

It’s little tricks like this that allow me to stay ahead and make sure I’m speaking to my intended audience.

Think about what you know about your corner of the education world:

Maybe you're a social worker and know specifics about the timing of parent and caregiver phone calls.

Maybe you have an understanding of the organizational skills and prioritizing of an administrator.


Whatever it is, leverage that time so that you and your customers can make the most of it!

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A Part of My Job

A part of my job, I realize, as a teaching poet in the school, is to make the students laugh. To keep them entertained. Yes, even if it means resorting to cheesy gimmicks like me acting like I am getting attacked by a shark in a box
— Inside My Pencil: Teaching Poetry in Detroit Public Schools by Peter Markus

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Keeping Workshop Notes

I’ve recently been invited to present at education conferences and poetry festivals. This Include's SXSWedu, Split this Rock, and Berklee's ABLE Assembly.

Screenshot of flyer for Berklee College’s ABLE Assembly. Woman in yellow jacket and black dress speaks to an auditorium full of people sitting and listening attentively, some taking notes others just watching.

Screenshot of flyer for Berklee College’s ABLE Assembly. Woman in yellow jacket and black dress speaks to an auditorium full of people sitting and listening attentively, some taking notes others just watching.

It’s amazing and I’m incredibly excited, but preparing for these session makes me wonder: how do I stay present in the work?

With these presentations looming over me, it’s easy to over analyze sessions. A common inner monologue I have running is: “Okay, is there any part of this I can use in a speech? How can I frame this?”

I don’t want to start seeing these groups as case studies. They’re workshops full of incredibly talented and creative young writers. I want to keep myself and my curriculum flexible rather than worry about the potential talking points and video clips (I make a point to film all the sessions).

However it’s a difficult balance.

One thing I've done to offset this feeling is keep a journal. After every day of workshops I write short reflections: the highs and lows, anything of note, anything I need to try for next time, etc. while it's still fresh in mind.

I call them workshop notes (hence the name of this blog) playing on the session notes that OT, Speech, PT, Mental Health, and other therapists make after they see a student.

Knowing ahead of time that I've blocked off time in my schedule to reflect gives me the freedom to stay flexible and present during a session. I can't recommend this enough for anyone doing work in Arts Education. It's an easy enough practice, it's only as time intensive as you want to make it, and it's helped me keep track of the work I've done, making it easier to look back and, as result, look ahead without losing focus on the present

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PoEdtry Podcast

I'm starting up a podcast called poEDtry that focuses on arts education and special education.

For the inaugural episode of the poEDtry podcast I sat down with my good friend and colleague Melissa to talk about reading, mindfulness as classroom management, and self-care.

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